Benji Durden

photo: http://lifeskillsconsultingllc.com
Tony-Benji-Kyle 1980 Reunion 2008

photo: lifeskillsconsultingllc.com


Benji Durden is a Boulder, Colorado based coach of elite runners who came to prominence as a distance runner in the early 1980s. Benji was a member of the 1980 U.S. Olympic marathon team, placing second. Benji recorded 25 sub-2:20 marathons in less than a decade and ranked among the top ten U.S. marathoners for six straight years, reaching seventh in the world in 1982. His lifetime best of 2:09:57 came with his 3rd place finish in the 1983 Boston Marathon. Benji continues to run as a Grand Masters (50 and older) in marathons around the country.

1983 Boston Marathon (Durden is on right).  Photo: Bob Howard for the Chicago Sun Times

1983 Boston Marathon (Durden is on right). Photo: Bob Howard for the Chicago Sun Times

Rich Castro

photo: boulderhistory.org

photo: boulderhistory.org

Rich Castro has been a fixture of the Boulder running community for decades. Rich is the founder and president of the Boulder Road Runners has been associated with the BolderBOULDER in which he has coached winners in the citizen’s race, the wheelchair race, and in the elite divisions since 1979. He has also served as distance coach for Ecuador in the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, as track coach for the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program, as Global Athletics Consultant for Reebok International, and as Road Racing Athletes Consultant for Nike Inc. While he did not become an elite runner, Castro did become a coach of elites and non-elites alike. He coached sprinters at CU and helped start the school’s women’s track and cross country programs, which quickly included middle distance star Mary Decker. As head of the Frank Shorter Racing Team in the mid-1980s, he worked with stars such as Stan Mavis, Herb Lindsay and Steve Flanagan.Castro_Rich-USxc10-200x300

Dan Reese

photo: Readytalk.com

photo: Readytalk.com

Dan Reese is the middle of three brothers who ran for the University of Colorado at Boulder. As a Buff, the 1987 graduate was a two-time All-American in cross-country and a longtime record-holder in the 3,000m steeplechase. Afterward, he was a bronze medalist at the 1995 Pan Am Games. Dan comes from a huge family of Colorado runners. Dan’s older brother, Sam Reese, was a cross country All-American, his younger brother, Tom Reese, was a three-time All-American (while coached by Dan), and older brother Dave, is a former Denver Marathon champ, a former Northern Colorado athlete and a former running coach at Mullen High School. Adding to that list is Dan’s son, Michael Reese, who is running for the Buffs now. When not working or running, Dan enjoys spending time with his family and coaching his kids.

photo: coloradanmagazine.org

photo: coloradanmagazine.org

PattiSue Plumer

photo: gostanford.com

PattiSue Plumer is a retired American long-distance runner who ran twice in the Olympics. She ran first in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea where she finished 13th in the 3,000m. In 1992 in Barcelona, Spain she ran in the 1,500m, finishing 10th, and the 3,000m, finishing 5th. On July 3, 1989 she set the American record in the 5,000m at 14:59.99, and was the first woman to beat one of Mary Decker’s sweep of all distance running American records during the 1980s. She won the 1990 Fifth Avenue Mile, setting a course record which remains unbeaten. Patti Sue attended Stanford University, where she won the 1984 NCAA Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Championship at 5000m and the NCAA Women’s Indoor Track and Field Championships at two-m,iles in 1983. She won multiple national titles at 3,000m and 5,000m and was a three-time runner-up in the 1,500 meters. She received her Juris Doctor (J.D.) from Stanford Law School and worked as a lawyer for several years. She now coaches cross-country and track at Stanford University in Northern California.

Leading in the 1988 Olympics

Leading in the 1988 Olympics

Jerry Quiller

LARGE-Display  •   Coached at Wayne State, Colorado State, Idaho State, Colorado, the       United States Military Academy and the U.S. Olympic team

•   His coaching career spanned more than 40 years

•   Directed 19 All-Americans, including Olympians Adam Goucher and          Alan Culpepper

•   Named the Patriot League Coach of the Year 22 times

The late Jerry Quiller, affectionately known as “Coach Q”, was inducted to the Hall posthumously, having passed away on February 3, 2012, after a long after a long battle with multiple myeloma. Jerry, a Fort Collins native, was a highly successful coach and fixture in the track and field community in Colorado. After a successful high school and college career himself, Jerry developed into an incredible track and cross-country coach leading his CU teams to three Big Eight Conference titles and 12 trips to the NCAA Championships (both men’s and women’s teams). He was named the league’s coach of the year five times and directed 19 All-Americans, including Olympians Adam Goucher and Alan Culpepper. Jerry was also one of the most successful coaches in Army history. He guided the Army men’s and women’s cross-country and track teams to 37 Patriot League titles in 13 seasons and was named the Patriot League Coach of the Year 22 times. He is remembered not only as a great coach, but also an amazing and genuine man.

(photo: cubuffs.com)

(photo: cubuffs.com)